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Trayvon Martin, an American son

Trayvon Martin, an American son

latimes.com OP-ED Real and sustained change on the racial equality front has to be a family effort, an effort of the entire dysfunctional American family. By Erin Aubry Kaplan – July 20, 2013 The timing of the two stories couldn’t be better: the not-guilty verdict in the murder trial of George Zimmerman in the killing of black teenager Trayvon Martin, and a major reassessment of the state of black families in America done in advance of the 50th anniversary of the Moynihan Report. What do these two things have in common, beyond stoking racial controversy? At first glance, not much....

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Hundreds Turn Out for Research Forum

Hundreds Turn Out for Research Forum

Moynihan Revisited: Assessing Changes in the African American Families over the Past Five Decades  In 1965, the U.S. Department of Labor released a report entitled, “The Negro Family: The Case for National Action,” authored by Daniel Patrick Moynihan. The controversial report linked the relatively low-levels of nuclear families in the black community to high levels of poverty and argued that progress against poverty required strengthening families especially Black Men. Almost five decades after the release of the Moynihan Report, the Urban Institute, in collaboration with Fathers...

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The Moynihan Report Reveals A 50 Year Old Story for Black Families

The Moynihan Report Reveals A 50 Year Old Story for Black Families

By Kenneth Braswell Executive Director | Fathers Incorporated One can’t dismiss the societal challenges for Black families since the civil rights movement. To most today, 1965 seems like 200 years ago. Many pioneers of that time would be challenged to say that they would live to see a Black President in office in less than 50 years since then. Fortunately for Blacks in America, the latter has occurred with the election and re-election of Barack H. Obama; yet unfortunately many of the challenges faced in 1965 for Black families still exist today. While many strives have been made for Blacks...

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Examining the State of the Moynihan Report

Examining the State of the Moynihan Report

By Kenneth Braswell It has been an eye opening experience to hear from so many scholars about the atmosphere during the time that the Moynihan Report was published. I, like many others get caught up in the nostalgia of the civil rights movement. If you were born like me in the early sixties; you remember the residue from the sixties; but have more of a reference point from the seventies. In context for me the sixties is more revered than experienced. I liken it to finding out about a deep family secret. I remember some years ago sitting amongst cousins talking about my grandfather. Although I...

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SEE EVENT VIA WEBCAST

SEE EVENT VIA WEBCAST

Michelle will serve as the keynote speaker for the February 22nd research finding forum of the Moynihan Report Revisited. The event will take place at the Urban Institute in Washington, D.C. WEBCAST LINK: http://www.ustream.tv/channel/urban-institute-events Michelle Alexander Bio Michelle Alexander is a highly acclaimed civil rights lawyer, advocate, and legal scholar who currently holds a joint appointment at the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity and the Moritz College of Law at The Ohio State University. Prior to joining the Kirwan Institute, Professor Alexander was an...

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Project Launches to Revisit 1965 Moynihan Report

Project Launches to Revisit 1965 Moynihan Report

Few U.S. politicians have impacted the societal conversation regarding Black Families in America like former NYS Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan. His authoring of the “The Negro Family: A Case For National Action,” has become one of the biggest less talked about realities for the American public. His courageous exploration into the depths of racial paradoxical systems forces us to reexamine the statistical and cultural evidence of the 21 Century. 2015 marks the 50th anniversary of the controversial “Moynihan Report” of 1965. While social, academic and political critics of that time...

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